Friday, November 30, 2012

New post on!

The most important equipment for a runner is a pair of properly-fitting running shoes. Before you go the store, think about your running style and ask yourself these questions, suggests Tom Boland, a certified pedorthist (footwear specialist) in New York City:

  • Do you run on pavement or on trails where the surface is often uneven?
  • How much running do you do in the course of a week?
  • Are you a distance runner?
  • Do you run or do you jog?

Your answers will help you choose the right type of running shoe. A knowledgeable running-shoe salesperson can help direct you to the most appropriate shoes for your running routine and style.

Running Shoes: What’s Your Style?

In general you want running shoes with thick, cushioned soles and good support. And it sounds obvious, but be sure you pick a pair of shoes that are designed for running: Cross-training, aerobics, or tennis shoes may look similar, but they don’t have the right features.

There are a number of different types of running shoes, including trail shoes and racing shoes. Pick the design that matches your performance and your terrain:

  • Racing shoes are lightweight, high-performance shoes designed for speed. They’re not meant for everyone.
  • For long-distance running, be sure to find a shoe that provides cushioning as well as support.
  • For running on trails and uneven surfaces, select a shoe that provides both traction and support. Trail shoes are designed for off-road running on dirt, grass, or sand surfaces. They are often water resistant to some degree and are designed to provide good traction, stability, and support.

Running Shoes: Added Features

If you’ve just started running, there’s no need to buy high-performance shoes. Focus instead on the three basics (cushioning, shock absorption, support) as well as on the following:

  • Stress comfort, not appearance. You won’t enjoy your runs if you have foot pain, so look for shoes that feel good right out of the box and don’t rub on any part of your feet.
  • Flexibility is important, too. You should be able to bend the shoe fully at the ball of the foot as you run.
  • Some running shoes are designed to provide extra support on the side of the shoe nearest the arch for people who overpronate. We pronate (roll the foot inward, so that the sole of the foot turns outward) and supinate (roll the foot outward, so that the sole of the foot turns inward) as we walk or run on uneven surfaces, says Boland. People who overpronate habitually roll the foot inward, and tend to have flattened arches. Choose running shoes that compensate for this, if necessary.

Running Shoes: More Shopping Suggestions

You can find running shoes at a shoe store, sporting goods store, outlet store, or at a store that caters specifically to runners.

  • If you’re buying your first pair of running shoes, it’s important to choose a store with knowledgeable salespeople who will take the time to help you find shoes that fit properly and are designed for the type of running routine you have planned. You may find you do best by buying your shoes at a specialty running store.
  • Try on both shoes, lace them properly, and walk around the store. In most places, you can even take a few running strides in the store.
  • For the best fit, be sure you’re wearing the type of socks you’ll wear when running.
  • Fit varies from one brand to another, so you may need to try on several different brands of running shoes until you find one that’s comfortable. Make sure there is at least a finger’s width (about a half inch) between the end of your longest toe and the front of the shoe.

Running Shoes: Replacing Your Shoes

Running shoes don’t last forever. According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, about 60 percent of a shoe’s capacity for shock absorption is lost after 250 to 500 miles of use. To avoid foot problems, keep track of how many miles you run and replace your shoes as often as necessary.

Whether you’re training for a 5K, a marathon, or just running to get or stay fit, a good running shoe is vital to the success of your exercise program.


Medically reviewed by Pat F. Bass III, MD, MPH

Running Shoes: A Buyer's Guide

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Buffie "The Body" Carruth of Bodynomics is looking for women ages 25 and up for “PAID PROJECT” to participate in Buffie the Body’s Debut Fitness DVD; in association with Bodynomics. Buffie is searching for REAL women who are on the road to healthy living, not trainers, fitness buffs, or women who are typically seen in fitness DVDs. We want the everyday women! DVD will also give the chosen ladies National Exposure. November 18th - 24th is the last week we're accepting applications before interview process begins. 

ABOUT Bodynomics:

Bodynomics’s goal is aimed at helping women become more active, making them more aware of their personal health profile and body image, emphasizing workouts they can do at home, prioritizing health-over size, maintaining their curves by utilizing weights, instructing the proper ways to exercise to avoid injury, and keeping women informed on the latest research and articles concerning health, weight-loss and weight-gain, heart disease, and nutrition. For more details, visit 

CASTING Details:

Production will be filmed in the Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina area beginning in December of 2012.

Women of all race, shapes, and sizes are encouraged to apply.

Candidates MUST live in or near the Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina area as there will be an in-person interview after virtual application has been submitted. 

• must be serious and focused about exercising
• must be a female who exercise regularly (2-3 days a week)
• must provide own transportation & accommodations
• must be available for 3 consecutive days (8-10 hrs days)

For more details, visit and to complete application, click link

Monday, November 19, 2012

New post on!

A little here, a little there

The most basic way to lose weight is to slash calories. That’s Diet 101. But how many do you really have to cut or burn to see results? It’s simple: You can drop a pound a week by trimming 500 calories each day. (Calories burned are based on a 150-pound woman.)

In fact, do a couple of swaps a day and you can drop 10 pounds in 5 weeks! So try these 25 easy tweaks—and get the slim body you want in no time.

Tap your foot

Your skinnier friends are probably fidgeters, who burn up to 350 calories a day just by tapping their feet or being restless.

Try it for a few days. Walk around while you’re on the phone, or tap out a tune with your hands or feet (in the privacy of your own office, of course).

Step away from the nuts

Especially if they’re in a big bowl. The bigger the serving bowl, the more you’ll eat, Cornell University researchers say.

Nuts have heart-healthy fats, but they’re also high in calories: 1 handful (about 1 ounce) of oil-roasted mixed nuts has 175 calories; 3 handfuls have 525. Cut out nuts altogether and save more than 500 calories.

Can’t resist ’em? Eat pistachios: 2 handfuls are just 159 calories, and the shelling will slow down your munching.

Don’t eat in front of the TV

You’ll eat up to 288 calories more, according to research from the University of Massachusetts.

Instead, eat at the table, and trade 1 hour of TV for a casual walk. Together, that’s 527 calories burned.

Limit salad toppings

A big salad might seem healthy, but all those goodies on top can make it more calorie-laden than lasagna or fettuccine Alfredo. Cheese crumbles, caramelized nuts, bacon, avocado, dried fruit, croutons, and vinaigrettes can add lots of calories.

Save 500 or more calories by having just one topping, adding flavorful but lower-cal veggies (roasted bell peppers, grilled onions, or mushrooms), and using half the dressing.

Use smaller plates

Swap your 12-inch plate for a 10-inch one. You’ll eat 20 to 25% less—and save up to 500 calories.

You won’t feel any less full, either, researchers say.

Skip the whip

Or at least size it down. Dessert-like coffee creations can contain as many as 670 calories, with large sizes and options like whipped cream, whole milk, and syrups.

Craving whipped cream? Try it on a shot of espresso for a total of just 30 calories. You save 640 calories!

Count your chips (and crackers)

No, you can’t eat your snacks from a large bag or box because it’s waaaay too tempting to eat until the bag is empty. (Remember Oprah’s blue corn–tortilla chip confession?)

A chip-bender to the bottom of a 9-ounce bag is 1,260 calories sans the dip. So stick to 1 serving, about 15 chips—that’s 140 calories—or pick up some 100-calorie snack packs and save 1,120 calories.

Serve and sit

Family-style meals, with platters and bowls of food on the table, invite people to go back for seconds and thirds.

Cut hundreds of calories by filling plates before bringing them to the table; leave serving dishes in the kitchen, too.

Skinny up cocktails

Syrups, sour mix, sugary fruit juices, and creamy additions turn drinks into desserts: an indulgent Mudslide can have more than 800 calories.

Order drinks mixed with club soda, tonic water, cranberry juice, or a squeeze of citrus; or try distilled liquors on the rocks. You’ll save up to 800 calories.

Eat less pasta

One cup of pasta is just 220 calories. But typical dinner portions at restaurants can be as much as 480% larger than that 1 cup, according to New York University research.

That’s 1,056 calories. Even if you eat 2 whole cups of noodles, you’ll still save 616 calories.

Limit dinner guests

Eating with seven or more other guests can make you eat 96% more food, says Brian Wansink, PhD, author of Mindless Eating.

That’s like doubling your dinner! Dine with fewer guests to save 500 or more calories.

Don’t clean your plate

Leave 25% of your food on the plate at every meal, says weight-loss expert James O. Hill, PhD, author of The Step Diet. Save what’s remaining as leftovers for a yummy lunch the next day.

If you normally eat 2,000 calories or more each day, you’ll cut 500 calories.

Make mine a mini

Check out menus for small versions of great desserts, so you can dodge calo­ries and end your meal on a sweet note.

P.F. Chang’s Great Wall of Chocolate (designed for one diner!) is 1,440 calories.The Mini Great Wall? A chocolatey yet svelte 150 calories. You’ll save 1,290-calories.

Nix that smoothie a day

A large 32-ounce smoothie can have 800 or more calories. That really adds up if you’re having on-the-go breakfast several times a week.

Instead, try a filling lower-calorie starter of oatmeal with brown sugar and banana slices, and a cup of black coffee. You’ll save 518 calories.

Beware the healthy-food trap

People let their guard down when the menu is full of healthy fare, underestimating calories by as much as 35%, research by the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab shows.

You’re also more likely to order drinks, sides, and desserts with up to 131% more calories when you have a healthy entrée. Skip caloric sides—a cookie, chips—to save 500-plus calories.

Beware hidden oils

Ask to have your food cooked with a little stock instead of oil, or order steamed or poached entrées: you’ll save 124 calories per tablespoon of oil.

Also, have the kitchen skip oils added at the last minute like basil oil or chive oil, and save another 40 calories per teaspoon.

Get enough sleep

A lack of shut-eye can make you snack, new research from the University of Chicago shows. People who got only 5 1/2 hours of sleep noshed more during the day.

Snooze more and save about 1,087 calories.

Be the hostess with the mostest

Go grocery shopping for 1 hour, put away your groceries, spend 2 hours cooking a fabulous holiday feast, set the table, and serve.

Then toast yourself for the awesome 640 calorie-burn. (A glass of Champagne is only about 106 calories, so you’re still ahead.)

Kick the soda habit

A 12-ounce soft drink has about 150 to 180 calories. If you down two or three a day, you’re getting lots of extra calories.

Quench your thirst with water and save as many as 540 calories.

Simple tricks to fill up (with less!)

For breakfast, eat 2 boiled or poached eggs. (You’ll feel fuller and eat about 416 fewer calories the rest of the day.)

Before lunch and dinner, enjoy 1 cup low-cal soup. (You’ll eat about 134 calories less at each meal.) And save a total of 684 calories for the day.

Ditch that buttered movie popcorn

Yes, the large popcorn at the concession stand weighs in at a whopping 1,005 calories.

Smuggle in your own (microwave-popped, 94% fat-free, of course) and save more than 700 calories.

Get in tune with your tummy

Pay attention to how full you feel, and put down your fork when you’re satisfied.

Listen to your body’s cues—instead of looking at whether the plate is clean—and save up to 500 calories a day.

Drink sugar-free

A 20-ounce tea with added fruit juices can have 400-plus calories. And Southern-style sweet tea isn’t much better than soda: a 16-ounce bottle of syrupy sweet tea has 180 calories; three of those are 540 calories.

Choose sugar-free sips and save more than 400 calories

Check the number of servings in a dish

The calorie count on the menu for Shrimp Fried Rice may say 350 calories per serving, but what’s set in front of you may actually contain 4 servings. Split it with three friends, and save 1,050 calories.

Think small at the ice cream shop

Even if you indulge in your favorite full-fat flavor, you’ll save as many as 550 calories with a 5-ounce size instead of a 12-ounce.


25 Ways to Cut 500 Calories a Day

Sunday, November 18, 2012

New post on!

Healthy Alternatives for Pointless Foods

You have to hand it to food-industry execs. They seem to have an unparalleled ability to turn the healthiest foods into the absolute worst junk or convince you that you can only get nutrition from water additives or cookies pumped full of vitamins. Here are some of the most absurd examples of their efforts so far, and how you can truly eat healthy—no fake health claims required.

Mio Water Enhancer

The Gimmick: Water is the healthiest beverage on earth, but according to Kraft Foods, it’s “like a yawn in a glass.” Enter their new product Mio, brightly colored, artificially flavored concentrate that “enhances” your perfectly healthy glass of H20. In addition to petroleum-based food dyes linked to ADHD and allergies, the third ingredient is propylene glycol, another petroleum-based ingredient used, among other things, to make plastics and keep paint from drying out. And sure, it’s “calorie free,” thanks to sucralose, an artificial sweetener created by processing sugar with chlorine gas.

Eat This Instead: If your water bores you, don’t turn it from a natural wonder into a modern-day chemistry experiment. Slice up a lemon, add some frozen or fresh fruits, or brew some iced green tea.


The Gimmick: Back in the day, homemade peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were considered a quick lunch fix, but Smucker’s has managed to turn this old favorite into a packaged supermarket product. Uncrustables are premade PB&J sandwiches with the crusts already removed, and they’re full of dangerous high-fructose corn syrup and heart-damaging hydrogenated oils. They are devoid of healthy fiber, which makes you want to eat more in the long run.

Eat This Instead: Organic peanut butter and jelly on organic spelt bread. (Your body can process ancient spelt better than modern whole wheat.)


The Gimmick: Most people would agree that it’s not too difficult to spread cream cheese on a bagel. The food industry thinks otherwise, and has come out with prepackaged, pre-stuffed bagels. What you might not realize is these are also stuffed with corn- and soy-derived ingredients that come from crops genetically engineered to be doused in pesticides. That winds up inside of your food.

Eat This Instead: Forget the mood-killing engineered breakfast foods and instead, buy pastured eggs from a local farmer who supplements his flock with organic feed. Hens that exercise and eat grass and bugs on pasture produce eggs lower in cholesterol and saturated fat and two times higher in the healthy omega-3s department.

Splenda Essentials with Antioxidants

The Gimmick: The food system has an uncanny ability to jam corn into just about anything, including the nutrient-defunct artificial sweetener Splenda. Adding nutrients like antioxidants is a marketing gimmick, explains food expert and author Michael Pollan. Canada Dry is doing the same thing–adding antioxidants and vitamin C to products.

Eat This Instead: Opt for less-processed sweeteners that actually contain natural nutrients, like honey or stevia.

Yoplait Low-Fat Yogurt

The Gimmick: This yogurt may be low in fat, but it harbors a whopping 26 grams of sugar; that’s more than what you’ll find in a Twinkie! The sugar overload will cause an energy crash later, not exactly what most people are looking for in something touted as a healthy breakfast food.

Eat This Instead: Stonyfield Greek Oikos yogurt sweetened with a dab of real honey. The high protein content will keep you feeling full longer, and the honey is loaded with naturally-occurring antioxidants.

Lucky Charms

The Gimmick: General Mills makes a big deal out of a whole grain topping Lucky Charms’ ingredients list, but label hype is less explicit when it comes to sugar content, and the fact that the whole grain (corn) comes from genetically engineered, pesticide-doused crops.

Eat This Instead: EnviroKidz Leaping Lemurs Organic Cereal–its sugar content is lower, and the sweetness comes not from factory-made high-fructose corn syrup, but from mineral- and calcium-rich molasses. Genetically engineered ingredients are banned in organics.

Special K Cereal Bars

The Gimmick: This extension brand for Special K cereal is saying, in essence, “Forget the bowl, the milk, and sitting down.” What you’re really getting is a dose of heart-damaging trans fats and potentially carcinogenic BHT, an unnecessary chemical used to retard rancidity in oils.

Eat This Instead: First, try not to eat on the go in the first place. About 20 percent of meals are rushed and eaten in the car, which leads to poor food choices and bulging waistlines. If you really need to eat on the run, choose an organic BumbleBar; it doesn’t contain freaky industrial chemicals, and the sesame seed and nut ingredients pack a protein punch that will keep you feeling full.

VitaMuffin Vitatops

The Gimmick: Here’s another example of junk food masquerading as health food. Full of injected fiber that your body may not readily digest, this muffin top won’t even satisfy your hunger. What’s more, the advertising urges you to eat on the go, a big no-no if you’re trying to lose weight.

Eat This Instead: Whip up this Yam Spice Muffin recipe. It’s balance of naturally-occurring fiber and protein and blood-sugar-regulating cinnamon will leave you feeling fuller longer. Plus, the entire muffin (not just the top) is just 140 calories!

WhoNu? Nutrition Rich Cookies

The Gimmick: ”Nutrition-rich” cookies? WhoNu the food industry could come up with a way to make sugary, high-carb treats seem healthy? Advertised as being an “excellent source of calcium, iron, vitamins A, B12, C, D and E,” they also “have 3 grams of fiber and 20 essential vitamins and minerals.” Well, an apple has 4 grams of fiber and 20 vitamins and minerals, as well; as do bananas, blueberries, grapes, nectarines, and dozens of other naturally sweet fruits that come without the refined flour and genetically modified ingredients.

Eat This Instead: Any of the above. Or take WhoNu’s marketing claims to heart and eat a bowl of oatmeal or a cup of spinach or cottage cheese, or drink a glass of milk, carrot juice, or tomato juice—all foods that their “nutrition-rich” cookies claim to match.

Chocolate Milk with Omega-3s

The Gimmick: Why get heart- and brain-boosting omega-3 fatty acids from something boring, like healthy, sustainable fish? No, you need to drink them in the form of liquid sugar, according to the growing variety of flavored milk products fortified with the fish oils. Flavoring milk adds 40 to 60 calories per serving and adds 15 grams of sugar to an otherwise healthy glass of plain, protein-rich milk.

Eat This Instead: Get your omega-3s the way nature intended, from sustainable, contaminant-free seafood. Here’s why: A single serving of wild Alaskan salmon contains 2,060 grams of EPA and DHA omega-3s. That glass of enriched milk? Just 30.

Bottled Water

The Gimmick: Leave it to the food industry to take something that flows freely from your tap, scare you into thinking it isn’t safe, then bottle it and sell it to you for a 1,000 percent markup. Most bottled waters are nothing more than tap water that has supposedly gone through extra filtration processes. However, independent testing of bottled water conducted by the Environmental Working Group has found that popular brands contain, on average, 8 different contaminants, ranging from bacteria to fertilizer residues to carcinogenic disinfection by-products, some that exceed legal limits for tap water.

Drink This Instead: Drink tap water, and contact your local water supplier for your annual water quality report. It will tell you if there are any pollutants that could be removed by a filter, which is much cheaper than buying hundreds of bottles.

Fruitless Fruit Juice

The Gimmick: This is a classic move in the juice trickery playbook: Use inexpensive fake food dyes–not actual fruit juice–to give the liquid an appealing color. Here’s a sad example: Tropicana Twister Cherry Berry Blast contains 0 percent berry and cherry juice, despite the name of the drink. The color comes from artificial dye Red #40, which has been linked to hyperactivity and other behavioral problems in some kids.

Eat This Instead: Eat actual fruit for a fiber-rich boost that will help you avoid an unhealthy spike in blood sugar and leave you feeling full longer. When you want an occasional juice, look for an organic brand like R.W. Knudsen. Organic certification means a maker can’t get away with using chemical food dyes. For children, try Honey Kids; it’s organic and isn’t loaded with excess sugar.


The Gimmick: Marketers use scare tactics to trick you into buying this vitamin-D-loaded drink. Touted as a delicious drink designed to provide all the benefits of vitamin D without the harmful effects of being outside, this drink is loaded with vitamin D, a bone-strengthening, immune-boosting hormone that you can get much cheaper in supplement form, or by eating vitamin D-rich foods, like pastured eggs. As a general rule of thumb, avoid food and drinks making health claims, including ones that promise to boost your brainpower.

Eat This Instead: Opt for natural mood boosters, such as dark chocolate, asparagus, or cherry tomatoes.

Single-Serving Coffee Pods

The Gimmick: Convenient? Yes. Wasteful? Absolutely. Nearly every major coffee brand now sells pods designed for single-cup coffee makers, made from non-recyclable, non-biodegradable plastic. What’s more, even though the plastic is polypropylene, a less-toxic plastic, there’s growing evidence that, when subjected to heat, all plastics leach chemicals that can interfere with hormonal development.

Use This Instead: Buy yourself a stovetop espresso maker like those sold by Bialetti. They’re sold in one- to three-cup sizes, perfect for a single cup of your morning brew.

Pediasure Shakes

The Gimmick: Getting your baby hooked on these vanilla, chocolate, or strawberry shakes probably isn’t a good thing for several reasons. Although the label claims that they boost nutrition, these shakes feature sugar as the second ingredient. Other additives include vague artificial flavors. “Parents likely perceive these shakes as nutritious when, in fact, they are likely a source of over-nutrition, providing a lot of calories and added sugar,” says Andrea Deierlein, MD, postdoctoral fellow of preventive medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Eat This Instead: HappyBaby Yogis organic snacks are low in sugar and rich in digestive-system-friendly, yogurt-based probiotics. The fruit is freeze-dried, meaning it’s high in nutrients.


Food Gimmicks in Your Supermarket

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

New post on!

Your pre-or-post-workout protein shake may taste great, but if you’re not careful, it could actually undo your efforts to lose weight and be healthy.

The Pros Of Protein Shakes

PRO: For people who don’t have time to get their protein intake through food or want a quick recovery drink after a workout, protein shakes are a good alternative, according to nutritionist Keri Glassman, R.D.

What’s more, protein can aid in weight loss. Recent research published in the journal Cell found that digested proteins create a chain reaction in the digestive, nervous and circulatory systems that leave you feeling full hours after eating. That long-lasting satiety helps you eat less later on, which can mean a lower-or at least a steady-number on the scale.

While protein shakes can definitely benefit your body, there are some rules you need to follow to make sure your shake isn’t just setting you up for failure.

5 Protein Shake Rules You Should Always Follow

Make Sure There’s Enough Protein In It. Is what you’re drinking actually a protein shake? elebrity dietician Ashley Koff, R.D. That means one with healthy and adequate sources of this important nutrient. “Make sure you’re not compromising on quality, so look at what the source of protein is,” suggests Koff.

Make Sure You’re Using The Right Kinds Of Protein. It’s best to rely on whole food sources of protein whenever possible versus highly-processed forms. Organic soybeans, whole pea, sprouted quinoa, hemp, sprouted brown rice and egg whites are all excellent, healthy protein sources for your shake.

Make Sure You’re Not Using Too Much Protein. When it comes to the amount of protein you should get, more is not always better. Ideally, you want six to 15 grams of protein in your shake. Some will have as much as 20 to 30 grams, but there’s no way your body is going to absorb all of that, notes Koff. Likewise, anything less than six grams is not a decent source of protein.

Make It Yourself Whenever Possible. How can you be sure of what you’re getting? One easy way is to make them yourself. But when a blender, your favorite milk and some fresh produce are not available, pre-packaged shakes or restaurant ones can be a convenient option-just be aware of the ingredients, particularly preservatives and sugar.

Don’t Forget About Portion Sizes

Portion control is also key for healthier drinks. A super-sized protein drink, no matter what the ingredients are, will not necessarily be good for your body, and may end up causing weight gain.

“Many protein shakes have as many calories as a full meal, and some could even have a whole day’s worth,” warns Glassman. “Keep in mind: Are you using a protein shake as a post-exercise snack or as a meal replacement? Take note and monitor what you are drinking.”


5 Protein Shake Rules You Should Always Follow

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

I Bet You Think This Video Is About You, Don't You? Truth Hurts..

Before you get all upset, WATCH the video first! This may not be about you.


Don’t get your panties in a wad BECAUSE this video may not be about you. But if it is, hopefully it gets your mental wheels turning in a positive direction.

I Bet You Think This Video Is About You, Don't You? Truth Hurts..

Sunday, November 4, 2012

Don't watch this video UNLESS you're ready to get it in!!  So grab your weights and let's work! I want you ladies to follow along as we build "GREATNESS" in the glutes!

Saturday, November 3, 2012

in the lab showing ladies how to turn "FLAT-NESS" into "PHAT-NESS" .... video coming soon!


Thursday, November 1, 2012